David's ADHD

By: Sherrill S. Cannon
Illustrated by: Kalpart
Publisher: SBPRA
Publication Date: December 2019
ISBN: 978-1950860432
Reviewed by: Ellen Feld

Author Sherrill S. Cannon tackles an important and timely subject in her latest children's book, David's ADHD.

Readers meet David in his classroom where all the students are attentively listening to their teacher. All the students except David. Instead of listening, David is distracted by his pencil. Throughout the day, David has problems in and out of class. He can't sit still and he easily gets angry and frustrated. David shoves and plays too rough and his behavior was having an impact on those around him too.

Written in an easy flowing rhyme that children will happily follow along with, the book explains what ADHD is, and how to recognize it in others and themselves:

Everyone thought he was out of control; His angry resentment was taking its toll. The kids wouldn't play with him; he was too rough. He'd push and he'd shove, and he'd grab at their stuff. Nobody liked him or wanted him near, And he seemed to be getting worse, year after year.

David's ADHD doesn't sugarcoat the issue, but it also handles the topic with care and understanding. In the story, David's parents realize that something is wrong so they take their son to the doctor. Once they have a diagnosis, David now has options for dealing with his ADHD. The author explains (all in rhyme) how some people need to take medicine, others find having schedules to




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follow helps, while still others might have a therapist to teach coping skills.

I was interested in reading/reviewing this book primarily because my son, now grown, was diagnosed with ADHD back in elementary school and I wanted to see how the author would tackle the subject. After reading the book, I suspect Ms. Cannon has worked with children with ADHD because she covered all the issues/solutions surrounding ADHD that we experienced. Those solutions include using a computer keyboard to type out classroom work, to following a strict schedule as well as having simple rules to follow. She also makes it clear that ADHD is something that must be dealt with every day:

He copes with ADHD day after day. He knows it may possibly not go away.

While presenting all the obstacles surrounding ADHD and ways of treating it, the book stays very positive. Children who may be struggling with ADHD will certainly see themselves in David and be encouraged at how he deals with his anger and hyperactivity. The book is also an excellent tool to teach all schoolchildren about those in their own classroom who may exhibit signs of ADHD so that they can better understand and help their classmates.

Quill says: Another winner from author Sherrill S. Cannon, this time on a topic that impacts so many children, and their families. David's ADHD should definitely find a place in every school library to help children with ADHD as well as to educate children who know someone with ADHD so that they can better understand, and interact, with their classmate(s).

For more information on David's ADHD, please visit the publisher's website at: sbprabooks.com/sherrillscannon